Born a Crime

Being humorous and intelligent are rare characteristics to display in a perfect balance. Trevor Noah not only has mastered that balance but turned it into an unforgettable and captivating memoir.

First impression? I thought Trevor Noah, a mixed kid who was funny and found his claim to fame on The Daily Show. Here’s his memoir about growing up in South Africa and there’s more than likely a ghostwriter who has actually written this.

I want to start off by saying that I was completely off.

After reading his memoir, I realize there is so much more to people than meets the eye even when it comes to celebrities. The story of his life would’ve been interesting if it merely covered being a mixed child in South Africa but, that is merely the background in this story. So much happened to Trevor in his youth.

I really enjoyed reading, “Born A Crime.” There were moments when I laughed out loud and times that I was genuinely surprised by what Trevor had lived through yet could recount with such a light-hearted and comedic tone. Trevor gave us a glimpse into his little bit of perspective in the world and I’m grateful. His intelligence is apparent in his writing and he uses incredible metaphors and anecdotes to explain why he is the way he is.

I would definitely recommend this book to readers who may not immediately gravitate towards non-fiction or memoirs. I think there’s a stigma (at least in my opinion) that all memoirs are filled with research and are boring. Boredom was the farthest thing from my mind while reading this, so I can’t recommend it enough.

Advertisements

The Girl on the Train

 

A la Gillian Flynn’s ‘Gone Girl,’ Paula Hawkins takes you on a dazzlingly hypnotic journey in the #1 New York Times Bestseller, “The Girl on the Train.” I know that if you’re looking into my track record, besides Amie Barrodale’s “You Are Having A Good Time,” all of my book reviews have been generally positive. I’m working on being more critical going forward and expressing more clearly WHY exactly, I enjoy one book in comparison to others similar to it.

As I have mentioned before, I’ve decided to delve further into the thriller and suspense genre. I live for the shows of the same genre so it would only make sense to explore the books. I had my first taste with “Gone Girl,” and it will probably be my basis for comparison for any and all thriller/suspense books that I read going forward. “The Girl on the Train,” as cliche as it sounds, legitimately blew me away. Hawkins flawlessly introduces you to the main character, Rachel, and flippantly provides you with intimate details of her character and how it affects people’s perception of her. From the first page where Hawkins casually interjects that Rachel has an overactive imagination to the final page of the story, every detail is important and serves a purpose. The sections in Rachel, Megan and Anna’s perspective all come together like three individual pieces of thread to eventually help complete the picture of what is truly going on. It is onlywhen the perspectives align with similar events and dates that you begin to truly grasp what is actually going on and who is truly responsible for the main events of the story.

I eagerly found myself flipping through the pages of this book to the point that it became 3:00AM without my realizing. Instead of foregoing the last 40-some odd pages for tomorrow morning, I refused to go to bed without finishing it. In all sincerity, if there were some other ranking system far more highly regarded than becoming a #1 New York Times Bestseller, I would recommend that this book be awarded that honor. It’s witty, charming and enveloping in the best possible way. It’s shocking that this would be Hawkins’ first thriller after being a journalist for 15 years. She has definitely shocked the masses and set the bar high for herself regarding any future projects. I hope to read more works from her. In terms of recommendation? I would recommend this to anyone looking to try out the thriller/suspense genre and someone interested in a little mystery.