Six of Crows: A Review

For those of you who have kept up with my blog, you know that I cannot resist a good young adult fantasy novel. Yes, I read other genres but the books I remember loving the most were young adult fantasy novels. After hearing all of the hype, I decided to purchase the duology of Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom. Leigh Bardugo does an unbelievable job of creating a dynamic universe that is overflowing with colorfully unforgettable characters.

The minute we are introduced to Kaz Brekker, I already know he will quickly become the bad-ass character that you can’t help but love. He is the Danny Ocean to a similarly assembled band of thieves. Each of the six members of the team have a particular skill set, along with a complicated background story to explain how they found themselves here. Despite different back stories, they all found themselves agreeing to embark on an impossible heist with the highest stakes and potential for highest reward. Bardugo separates chapters by each character’s perspectives. These chapters help you gain a deeper understanding of each person’s past but also provides insight into what their motivations are during this journey. Apart from the story itself, which captivates the reader from the first page to the last, Bardugo supplies fluid prose without stutter. Her strong writing, in combination with the incredible plot, are what make Six of Crows a five-star must-read. 

I’m unsure if I want to jump directly into Crooked Kingdom (the second novel in the series) or take a break to read some other titles on my TBR. I’ll keep you guys posted.

XO

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Everything Everything

Nicola Yoon has been on my list of authors that I was looking forward to reading. I wasn’t quite sure whether to start with The Sun is Also A Star but once I saw the film trailer for Everything Everything, I knew that would be the first book of hers that I would have to read.

Yoon is an exceptionally talented writer and demonstrates her skills in character development, plot and descriptions in this novel. She is patient with the descriptions and really makes the main character, Madeline’s youthful and child-like fascination with the world believable. In the Q&A portion of the book, Yoon even says that the innocence of Madeline was largely inspired by her own infant daughter’s reactions to the world around her.

In all honesty, I hadn’t anticipated enjoying Everything Everything as much as I had. It was a new and fresh story that has never been told before. I think that there are themes like love and protection that are carried on throughout that really grip at the readers heartstrings and get them invested in the turn of events. I also respect Yoon for making the main female character multiracial. It’s not her identity but it is something that is made clear about her. I think that it’s incredible to have more culturally diverse characters in books, television and film because it really helps to inspire diverse readers and encourage diversity in the world. It helps remind audiences that fundamentally being different is nothing to be ashamed of.

****

I would recommend this book to YA readers, fans of John Green, fans of film to book comparisons, or anyone looking for an entertaining but light read.

Looking for Alaska

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Before reading “Looking for Alaska,” I had always seen quotes from the pages and never truly understood the context. For example, quotes about seeking the Great Perhaps or the quote “we are as indestructable as we believe ourselves to be.”

I’m honestly surprised that it took me this long to read this book. It was absolutely amazing, I think that John Green does a phenomenal job with the main character, Pudge. We can all relate to yearning for more at his age, yearning for adventure. In his case – that sense of adventure was Alaska. She opened his eyes to a whole new world and challenged him in a way that he had never been before. I really like how Alaska’s character is this flawed, impulsive and witty character. I wish there were more female characters like her in books and films, willing to take life by the horns and live their fullest life.

John Green is legendary within the YA community with bestsellers like The Fault In Our Stars, Paper Towns, and An Abundance of Katherines. I’ve recently added some of his books to my library and look forward to reading them. John Green did not disappoint and was able to write a memorable piece of fiction that has managed to impact his readers years later.

The Truth About Alice

High school, bullying, slut shaming…oh, the good old days – NOT! Unlike Gossip Girl and any John Hughes’ film, “The Truth about Alice” shows the truth of high school, especially in a small town where everyone knows everyone else.

You see how small rumors lead to gigantic repercussions. In the past few months, I’ve learned that I truly enjoy the style of narrative that uses two or more fragmented perspectives to move the plot forward. You also see how the different perspectives all eventually reach a head where you become the omniscient reader.

I recently read an article from refinery29 about the best YA books and “The Truth about Alice” is on there for a reason. It felt genuinely curious and adolescent in the best way. Even the open-endedness of the final page was well done. Much like our youth, the possibilities are endless and just when you’re beginning to give up is when you’re actually on the precipice of something new and exciting.